Skip to product information
1 of 6

Natalie Santoro Art

Queer Floral Mug **20% of Sales Donated**

Queer Floral Mug **20% of Sales Donated**

Regular price $95.00 USD
Regular price Sale price $95.00 USD
Sale Sold out

*6 Available*

Mugs are dishwasher and microwave safe. 14-16oz

Hand-painted art on functional Mug.

If local to Chicago and would like to pick up please select local pickup!

Handmade in Chicago

 

20% of profit from stickers will be donated to Brave Space Alliance which is the first Black-led, trans-led LGBTQ+ Center located on the South Side of Chicago, and designed to create and provide affirming and culturally competent services for the entire LGBTQ+ community of Chicago.


Violets: Started out with their symbolism all the way back with the Ancient Greek poet Sappho who referred to Lesbians as women who wore many crowns of violets.

Later, in the mid 1920s when a women in a play sent violets to another women there was a huge uproar and calls for censorship and boycotts, but many women started wearing violets on their lapels for support.

Pansies: After referring to gay men’s courtship as similar to that of flowers, the name Pansy stuck—especially for men who dressed more flamboyantly.

“The Pansy Craze” refers to the popularism of gay bars in the late 1920s, though that fell away during Nazism and Hollywood Homophobia.

Green Carnations: Oscar Wilde started wearing a green carnation as a symbol for the gay community in 1892. Elliot Page wore one on his lapel to the 2021 Met Gala.

Red Roses: Have been a symbol of love and friendship for a long time, but also a symbol of grief and loss. Our trans community suffers still one of the highest murder and assault rates of any group—specifically trans women of color. The term “Give us our roses while we’re still here” has become the slogan of Trans Day of Remembrance.

Lavender: During second wave feminism, the movement excluded Lesbians from the fight for gender equality. A group of lesbian activists fought their way into the mainstream movement by protesting women’s events wearing Lavender Menace shirts.

View full details